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Cerritos Sheriff's Station Weekly
Crime Summary

Updated February 3, 2016

January 25 – 31, 2016

There were 25 Part I felony crimes reported in Cerritos this past reporting period. This total matched the same total of the previous week. The following is a breakdown of crimes by category: six residential burglaries, two commercial/other structure burglaries, three grand thefts, nine vehicle burglaries, and five vehicle thefts. Cerritos Station deputies made five felony arrests, nine misdemeanor arrests, five warrant arrests, and issued 96 citations. The Sheriff’s dispatch center also received a total of 373 calls for service.

Residential Burglary:

12700 of block Charlwood Street (01/26—Evening): The suspect(s) entered the home by shattering the rear sliding door. It is currently unknown what was stolen.
15900 block of Indian Creek Road (01/25-26—Overnight): The suspect(s) entered the attached garage of the home by using the garage remote control. The remote control was located in the unlocked vehicle parked in the driveway. Stolen were several tools. No entry was made into the home.
19700 block of Frank Avenue (01/31—Day): The suspect(s) entered the home by shattering the rear window. It is currently unknown what was stolen.
13300 block of Bigelow Street (01/26—Afternoon): The suspect(s) entered the home by prying open the rear sliding door. Stolen was medication.
17500 block of Linda Way (01/28—Day): The suspect(s) entered the home via the unlocked front door. Stolen were valuables and a baseball cap.
13500 block of Village Drive (01/29—Day): The suspect(s) entered the home by kicking in the front door. Stolen items included a safe and a purse.

Commercial/Other Structure Burglary:

11400 block of South Street (01/27-28—Overnight): The suspect entered the location by shattering the glass front doors. Stolen was a safe.
17200 block of Alfred Avenue (01/24-25– Unknown): The suspect(s) entered the detached garage of the location via the garage door that had been left open. Stolen was a pair of bicycles.

Grand Theft:

11800 block of Del Amo Boulevard (01/15-01/24—Unknown): The suspect(s) stole Air Conditioner (AC) parts off of several AC units located at the top of the building.
11800 block of Del Amo Boulevard (01/15-01/24—Unknown): The suspect(s) stole AC parts off of several AC units located at the top of the building.
17900 block of Studebaker Road (01/28/16—Morning): The suspect took a cell phone out of the victim’s hand as he was walking through the parking lot.

Vehicle Burglary:

500 Los Cerritos Center (01/27—Afternoon): The suspect(s) entered a 2015 Chevrolet Trax by prying off the door trim on the front door. Stolen were license plates, which were stored in the glove box.
10900 block of Alondra Boulevard (01/28—Afternoon): The suspect(s) entered a 2006 Ford F350 by punching the door lock. Stolen was a backpack and jacket.
278 Los Cerritos Center (01/27—Evening): The suspect(s) entered a 2014 GMC Yukon by prying open the rear window. Stolen was the third row seat.
17000 block of Leal Avenue (01/29—Morning): The suspect(s) entered a 1995 Nissan 200SX and stole clothing and a bag. It is unknown how entry was made.
11900 block of Meadows Court (01/30—Morning): The suspect(s) entered a 2014 Toyota Corolla by prying open a window. Stolen was a coin purse.
18100 block of Bloomfield Avenue (01/28—Evening): The suspect(s) entered a 2006 Infinity FX35 by shattering a window. Stolen was a purse.
278 Los Cerritos Center (01/27—Evening): The suspect(s) entered a 2010 Cadillac Escalade by prying open the rear lock. Stolen was the third row seat.
12700 block of Towne Center Drive (01/27—Evening): The suspect(s) entered a 2003 Chevrolet Suburban by drilling a hole near the door lock. Stolen was a backpack.
500 Los Cerritos Center (01/27—Evening): The suspect(s) entered a 2002 Toyota Tundra by punching the door lock. Stolen were several tools.

Grand Theft Auto:

13000 block of La Jara Street (01/29—Morning): The known suspect stole a 2009 Toyota Tacoma from the driveway of the residence.
19600 block of Thornlake Avenue (01/25-26—Unknown): The suspect(s) stole a 2000 Honda CRV from the driveway of the residence.
12300 block of Ashworth Place (01/29-30—Overnight): The suspect(s) stole a 1998 Honda Civic from the driveway of the residence.
100 Los Cerritos Center (01/29—Evening): The suspect(s) stole a 1993 Nissan Sentra from the parking lot.
16800 block of Marquardt Avenue (01/22-29—Unknown): The suspect(s) stole a 2000 Hyundai trailer from the rear of the location.

Simple Prevention Tips

Your home is your castle...or is it? Is your home really safe once you leave for work or school? Your home is considered a sanctuary where you should feel safe. Your home is the only environment where you have control over who can get close to you and your family. Protecting your home and family from criminal intrusion should be high on your list of priorities. The first step is to harden the target or make your home more difficult to enter. Remember, the burglar will simply bypass your home if it requires too much effort or requires more skill and tools than he or she possess. Most burglars enter via the front, back, or garage doors, the rear slider or windows. Experienced burglars know that the garage door is usually the weakest point of entry, followed by the back door and windows. The garage and back doors also provide the most cover. Burglars know to look inside your car for keys, garage door openers and other valuables so keep it locked, even when parked inside your garage. Use high quality locks on exterior doors that resist twisting, prying, and lock-picking attempts.

Sliding glass doors are vulnerable to being forced open from the outside. Inserting a wooden dowel or stick into the track, thus, preventing or limiting door movement, easily prevents this. Other inexpensive devices can be found at your local hardware store to help secure windows and sliders.

Vehicle burglary is on the rise in Cerritos. This is partly due to the vast array of property that is left inside parked cars. Laptop computers, cell phones, GPS devices, aftermarket car stereo systems, video systems (often mounted in headrests), even purses and wallets are just a few examples of the “window shopping” goodies criminals feast upon. It takes less than a minute to break a vehicle’s window, unlock the door and remove items left inside. Most of the time there are no witnesses to these offenses because of the ease and speed of the theft.

Always remember to lock your vehicle. True, it only takes a second to break a window, but doing so makes noise—and criminals hate to make noise because it attracts attention. Hide valuables from sight, even better, take them with you. Try and hide your valuables BEFORE finding your destination parking spot. If a criminal sees you put a laptop in the trunk, they’ll just break into the trunk when you leave. The same applies for putting property under a seat. If a criminal sees you reaching under a seat, they’ll assume you left something of value there.

Vehicles are stolen from shopping malls, streets, driveways, parking lots, garages, and car dealerships. Automobile theft seems to occur with greater frequency where large groups of cars are parked together for extended periods, like shopping malls, theatres and parks. 

Never leave your car running or the keys in the ignition when you're away from it, even for "just a minute." Always roll up the windows and lock the car, even if it's in front of your home. Park in busy, well-lighted areas. Carry the registration and insurance card with you or leave a copy of those documents in the car after you have blotted-out your home address. Don't leave personal identification documents or credit cards in your vehicle. When you pay to park in a lot or garage, leave just the ignition or valet key with the attendant. Make sure no personal information is attached. Do the same when you take your car for repairs.

No one ever expects to be the victim of a crime. Consequently, crime prevention is rarely in the forefront of our daily lives. But the reality is it only takes a few minutes to protect yourself and your property. Once you start implementing the simple tips we provide every week, they will become habit and engrained in your everyday lives.

If you see suspicious person(s) or activity in your neighborhood or business, call Cerritos Sheriff’s Station at (562) 860-0044 or 911 immediately. It’s a good idea to keep the Sheriff’s Station phone number stored in your cell phone for quick reference.

Opportunities

Volunteers on Patrol Wanted

Looking for an interesting and useful way to serve your community? You may want to consider becoming a Sheriff's Volunteer on Patrol. Patrolling the City in distinctly marked vehicles, VOPs assist with crime suppression, traffic control, vacation checks, special events and park patrols. They serve as additional "eyes and ears" for the Sheriff's Department and train as first responders in the event of a major emergency or disaster.

For more information, contact the City of Cerritos Community Safety Division at (562) 916-1266, or visit the Division office at the Cerritos Sheriff's Station to obtain an application.

Neighborhood Watch Works—
Block Captains Wanted

Neighborhood Watch Block Captains are also a valuable and important way to serve your community and neighborhood. Block Captains serve as a liaison between residents and our Sheriff's Department by networking with neighbors, distributing information about crime incidents and trends, and providing feedback to our law enforcement personnel. Anyone interested in becoming a Block Captain is encouraged to contact the Cerritos Community Safety Division at (562) 916-1266.

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