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Cerritos Sheriff’s Station Weekly
Crime Summary

Updated April 24, 2014

April 14–20, 2014

There were 12 Part I felony crimes investigated during this week's reporting period, which is two more than the previous week. The following is a breakdown of the crimes by category: no robberies (always very good news to report); one aggravated assault; two residential burglaries (same as last week); two commercial/other structure burglaries; three grand thefts; three vehicle burglaries; and one stolen vehicle. Deputies made nine felony arrests, 11 misdemeanor arrests, three warrant arrests, and issued 172 traffic citations. The Sheriff's dispatch center also received 270 calls for service, an increase from the 2014 weekly average of 249 calls.

The aggravated assault took place on Felson Place early Sunday morning and involved a domestic dispute where a woman's boyfriend pushed her to the ground. The Sheriff's responded and arrested the boyfriend.

Along with the good news that no robberies were reported last week, there were suspects arrested in both of the reported residential burglaries. On Friday morning a resident who resides in the 17300 block of Grayland Avenue was driving away from his home when he noticed two men he did not recognize walking up his neighbor's driveway. The alert resident stopped his vehicle and watched for a couple of minutes and observed the men jump over his neighbor's side gate. A 9-1-1 call was quickly made to the Cerritos Sheriff's Station and responding deputies were able to detain the suspects as they ran from the location. The second residential burglary occurred at about 1 a.m. on Saturday at a home that was being fumigated in the 17300 block of Napa Circle. Sheriff's deputies had previously placed a portable alarm system in the residence and when the alarm activated deputies were dispatched. As with the burglary on Grayland Avenue, responding deputies quickly apprehended two suspects observed running from the location. The investigation did reveal that except for a couple of televisions, the homeowner had removed all items that burglars typically look for (guns, cash, and jewelry), which should always be the practice when leaving unlocked homes under a fumigation tent. Both of these cases involved excellent response by Sheriff's deputies and show how important it is to remember: If You See Something, Say Something.

On Sunday, April 13, a bicycle and television were reported stolen from a storage locker at the self-storage facility in the 16000 block of Piuma Avenue. The method of entry into this storage locker is unknown, but locks were torched and removed from another storage container door located at a business in the 12700 block of 166th Street. In this second burglary two boxes of glassware were stolen.

There were seven purses stolen from vehicles in Cerritos in the past 30 days, and this unfortunate trend continued this past week. Last Tuesday a Lexus parked in the 19700 block of Sheryl Avenue had its driver's window shattered sometime during the early morning hours and a purse stolen from the front passenger seat. Another vehicle burglary occurred on Tuesday involving a window that was shattered on a Hyundai SUV parked on 183rd Street at Cerritos High School. The victim had tried to hide her purse under a second row seat, but it was located by the suspect and it contained almost $500 in cash, a driver's license, and credit cards. The third vehicle burglary reported this past week occurred on Saturday afternoon and again involved another stolen purse from a vehicle parked on the 183rd Street side of Cerritos High School. As in the previous burglary, the victim had attempted to hide her purse under a car seat but someone shattered a rear window and found the purse. It is understood that items of value sometimes must be left in locked vehicles, but there are two important things to remember about car security: these types of crimes are rarely solved and suspects are seldom arrested; and a quarter-inch of window glass will not stop thieves from stealing your stuff. So, if you have a choice, never leave items of value in your car regardless of where it's parked.

The first grand theft reported last week occurred on Wednesday in the Home Depot lot on Alondra Boulevard. Shortly after 10 a.m. someone removed about $1,200 in work tools from the bed of a utility truck. On Wednesday afternoon a student at Tracy High School was sitting on a planter inside of the school when a suspect walked by and grabbed the phone from his hand. The suspect ran from the school and jumped into a white SUV and drove away. The final theft occurred Thursday evening at the AT&T store on South Street. A suspect entered the store, browsed around for a few minutes, and then grabbed three cell phones and a set of headphones and fled the location out of view.

The vehicle stolen last week occurred during overnight hours Monday morning in the 12800 block of Cantrece Street. A 1992 Honda Accord was taken and recovered the same day in Norwalk. The vehicle was undamaged and had not been stripped.

Cerritos residents, business owners, and their employees are encouraged to join the Cerritos Virtual Block Club (CVBC). If you are interested in helping our Sheriff's Department prevent and reduce crime, and enhancing your own personal and neighborhood safety, join the CVBC on-line at our website devoted to public safety in the City of Cerritos. We encourage you to share the information with your family, friends, and co-workers.

The City's safety website, www.safercerritos.com, has an extensive library of crime prevention tips, disaster preparedness information, and a variety of links to other relevant sites. On the website you can join the City's Virtual Block Club, regularly keep abreast of crime trends, and use the knowledge to protect yourself, your family, and your property. Neighborhood Watch works, and in partnership with Cerritos Sheriff's deputies you can significantly reduce your risk of becoming a crime victim.

Opportunities

Crime Prevention Town Hall Meeting

Looking for an interesting and useful way to serve your community?  You may want to consider becoming a Sheriff’s Volunteer on Patrol. Patrolling the City in distinctly marked vehicles, VOPs assist with crime suppression, traffic control, vacation checks, special events and park patrols. They serve as additional “eyes and ears” for the Sheriff's Department and train as first responders in the event of a major emergency or disaster.

For more information, contact the City of Cerritos Community Safety Division at (562) 916-1266, or visit the Division office at the Cerritos Sheriff's Station to obtain an application.

Volunteers on Patrol Wanted

Looking for an interesting and useful way to serve your community? You may want to consider becoming a Sheriff's Volunteer on Patrol. Patrolling the City in distinctly marked vehicles, VOPs assist with crime suppression, traffic control, vacation checks, special events and park patrols. They serve as additional "eyes and ears" for the Sheriff's Department and train as first responders in the event of a major emergency or disaster.

For more information, contact the City of Cerritos Community Safety Division at (562) 916-1266, or visit the Division office at the Cerritos Sheriff's Station to obtain an application.

Block Captains Wanted

Neighborhood Watch Block Captains are also a valuable and important way to serve your community and neighborhood. Block Captains serve as a liaison between residents and our Sheriff's Department by networking with neighbors, distributing information about crime incidents and trends, and providing feedback to our law enforcement personnel. Anyone interested in becoming a Block Captain is encouraged to contact the Cerritos Community Safety Division at (562) 916-1266. There are also numerous websites on the Internet that contain information about neighborhood watch programs around the country. All of our block captains and anyone interested in becoming a block captain are encouraged to visit downtownlongbeach.org/community-watch. This excellent website has in-depth information about how to start and operate a neighborhood watch program.

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